SFA: What's the Answer?

GEOLUXE®

SolSurDes

SFA Member

We have been challenged with what I would consider a relatively simple installation, but the material is GEOLUXE and we just can't seem to get it right.

I have contacted the company various ways but have yet to receive any support. Do you of you have any suggestions? It's the mitered edge and fragility of the stone that we are struggling with.

Natasha Jenk
ins

crobb

SFA Member

OHM International came to see us a week or two ago about GEOLUXE. They offered in-house training as most of the newer engineered material manufacturers do. We have yet to cut any, but I can at least provide you with our point of contact in hopes of them offering fabrication advice:

Valerie Fredrickson-Gendron
valarie@ohmintl.com
615-331-9440 (Office)
www.ohmintl.com

Cecil Robberts
Newman, Ga.
http://www.elegantesurfaces.com

Amroczka

SFA Member

What are the issues? From what others have posted on here, seems that GEOLUXE isn’t as bad as cutting Dekton or other sintered slabs. I thought they had a fabrication guide on their website.

Anthony Mroczka
A M Stoneworks
Kelseyville, CA http://www.kvillestoneworks.com
Anthony@kvillestoneworks.com

Alpha Tech

Guardian Sponsor

We recommend placing the material on top of a styrofoam board. The styrofoam board will support the slab and damp any vibrations caused during the cutting applications if the bridge saw table isn’t flat and level.

Alpha Tech Team
Alpha Professional Tools®
(201) 337-3343 / (800) 648-7229
(201) 337-2216 fax
alpha_tech@alpha-tools.com
www.alpha-tools.com

Dave.Scott

SFA Member

(Alpha Tech) X2 good idea.

Also, flat table (foam will help) water, water, water; listen to the blade-- making too much noise? Dress it.

We find that different colors will have different characteristics and fabrication approaches.

Where other gauged thin panels and sintered slabs can be quite challenging to fab and install, the manufacturer of GEOLUXE touts that they are a "molten" product where the others use pressures and heat to recrystallize the minerals, GEOLUXE should act differently/easier.

I cannot speak to the validity of that quite yet since we have not cut many GEOLUXE slabs.

Dave Scott
Slabworks of Montana
Bozeman, Mont.
NSI, SFA, USGBC
"What we leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others" -Pericles

Dan R.

SFA Member

GEOLUXE is a different animal than UC.

Does it cut more like glass than stone?

More brittle, less flexible (forgiving)?

I am not sure how "molten" does not use heat to recrystalize minerals. In fact, it could be argued that molten could be the highest heat achievable.

Soon, even the smallest shops will have to have waterjet technology, or so it seems with all of these newer materials.

A 5-axis water jet and no edge work would be nice. All miters, i assume.

Dan R.
Morris Granite
Morris, Ill.
815.228.7190
morrisgranite@sbcglobal.net
http://www.morrisgranite.com

Dave.Scott

SFA Member

Point of clarification.

From reading GEOLUXE info, the minerals are melted and poured into a mold, Sintered materials are pressed and then cooked. Both use heat.

innstone

SFA Member

Read the fabrication guide carefully. We found that it required way more work-arounds than any other "similar" product out there, so add increased programming and cutting.

When we looked at it, it seemed like a whole lot of tricks to try to get it to come out. We don't mind working with Neolith (and such), porcelain, or other challenging materials, but feel like this may be a product that should have failed but is being pushed to market anyway.

DAVE WORRELL
Pres. Innovative Stone
(530) 362-0779
email: dave@innStone.com
website: http://www.InnStone.com

That's it for this issue!